Winter Drought

This scant, sugary dusting of snow is the only kind of moisture we’ve had in months.

Next time you’re home and the temps are up into the 50s, get out your hoses. Give everything except the cacti and native plants a soak. Finish before temps start to fall. Unhook and drain the hoses. Then pat yourself on the back for saving some lives.

Your garden thanks you. Your trees adore you. Your grass can’t wait to kiss your feet.

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For the Time Being

For most of us, winter watering means dragging a hose.

For most of us, winter watering means dragging a hose.

It’s still devastatingly dry. In oreder to keep plants, shrubs, lawn, and soil alive in your Eastern Colorado landscape, you’ll more than likely need to water.

Here are some tips:

  • The best way to know if you need to water, is to poke a blade six inches into the soil, open a wedge and feel it. If it feels moist or is frozen, no need to water.
  • Check your soil at least every three weeks.
  • Don’t rely on a little bit of snow to do the trick. It often takes 10 inches of snow to equal one inch of rain.
  • Water when the temperature is above 40 degrees.
  • The best hours of the day for watering are usually between 10:00 AM and 2:00 PM. However, on very warm days, that window may be bigger.

Your neighbors, your wife, or your best friends might ask, “Why are you watering? Everything’s dead!”

That’s a perfect time to shine your intelligence. “They’re not dead. They’re dormant.”

There’s a big difference, and you know it.