Planting Season

Ed inspects the first delivery of annuals in mid May.

Ed inspects the first delivery of annuals in mid May.

May Day at tea time.

May Day at tea time.

We were wise to wait until after Mother’s Day to start planting annuals. Nights have remained cool. The soil was downright chilly. Soil temperatures regulate much of the activity above ground, and when they started to warm, our fair city greened in a hurry. It’s hard to believe that six short weeks ago, work was called on account of snow.

Although we have nearly finished planting annuals for the season, the carport and back patio are once again filling. This time it’s with perennials. We have projects ranging from converting an artificial turf putting green destroyed in the Waldo Canyon Fire to establishing groundcovers under a lofty canopy to planting up beds created in response to water shortages in an effort to reduce thirsty turf.

The old putting green about to receive its first plants.

The old putting green about to receive its first plants.

Planting season will continue through June, as long as daytime temperatures stay reasonably normal (no triple digits, please), and evenings cool. The one condition: Homeowners must take responsibility for regular hand watering to get plants established. To be within the rules of current water restrictions, any watering that takes place outside of your designated hours and days must be done with a drip system or by hose with a positive shut-off and on trees, shrubs, and beds only.

If too much heat comes into the forecast, we’ll take a break in planting. It really isn’t wise to ask plants to deal with getting situated in a new location during a hot spell. Too much stress. Don’t believe me? Try it yourself: Move to a house without air conditioning in, say, Houston in July. Doesn’t sound the least bit appealing, does it?

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3 thoughts on “Planting Season

  1. Well said as I have learned. Past a certain date and if there is little rain int he forecast I pot up plants and shrubs and give them a start until fall when I plant them in the garden.

  2. My perennials are all done, I think. My annuals were also delayed. With the cool weather I still have violas in the back containers, haven’t switched to summer shade annuals.

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